Table tennis club budget – OTTF http://ottf.org/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 18:47:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ottf.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-25T010803.862-150x150.png Table tennis club budget – OTTF http://ottf.org/ 32 32 Central Middle students chosen for honors choir https://ottf.org/central-middle-students-chosen-for-honors-choir/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 17:54:00 +0000 https://ottf.org/central-middle-students-chosen-for-honors-choir/ November 09, 2022 Mount Airy gets a new mayor, based on Tuesday’s election result which the two candidates involved say resulted from a high turnout. Jon Cawley, who has served as North Ward town commissioner since 2008, lost to Mayor Ron Niland in a May 17 primary but was victorious in the rematch for Mount’s […]]]>

Mount Airy gets a new mayor, based on Tuesday’s election result which the two candidates involved say resulted from a high turnout.

Jon Cawley, who has served as North Ward town commissioner since 2008, lost to Mayor Ron Niland in a May 17 primary but was victorious in the rematch for Mount’s most elected post. Airy.

Unofficial Surry County Board of Elections results showed Cawley received 1,915 votes (5% of the total vote), against Niland, who received 1,511 (4%).

Big push for Cawley’s support recently, as well as two issues he says fueled the result – involving a controversial downtown masterplan and a sign request from a local racing legend – are credited for victory.

“I went there planning to win and I had a lot of support from a lot of people and a lot of people went out to vote,” Cawley said Wednesday.

“Treva Kirkman was my campaign manager and we talked about winning,” he said of the determined mindset involved.

“And I feel like we ran a clean campaign,” the mayor-elect added. “This campaign had a lot of abuse, but I didn’t participate in it.”

The owner reacts

Niland was kind in his comments Wednesday about the nonpartisan election verdict and the underlying factors.

“Well, I don’t know if I was surprised,” added the mayor, who was appointed to the post last year to replace David Rowe, who previously held it before stepping down in October 2020 over charges. health reasons.

Niland credited his opponent’s campaign team.

“They worked very, very hard and they worked hard on early voting and I didn’t,” Niland acknowledged of a storyline that included Cawley stepping out for the start of that process the morning he started October 20.

The results of the one-stop, mail-in early voting period that ended last Saturday were evident with the release of the first returns for the mayoral race on Tuesday evening.

Before ballots from one of the city’s five wards had been counted, preliminary figures incorporating early voting showed Cawley a 1,163-to-998 advantage that held and gradually increased over the as the evening progressed.

Cawley had a lead of 182 votes after the results from a single constituency were released, which reached the winning margin of 404 votes after all were tallied.

“And the participation helped,” said the challenger.

“I just want to congratulate the winners,” Niland said Wednesday, referring not only to the mayor’s contest, but also to the three Mount Airy Board of Commissioners races that will see the five-member group get a trio of new ones.

All those elected on Tuesday will be sworn in at the beginning of December.

“I’m disappointed, obviously,” Niland said of his loss. “But I’m optimistic about the future of our city.”

The mayor, also a former city manager here, says he plans to prepare an official statement on the situation to read at the next council meeting on November 17.

Downtown, Fleming Factors

Along with the campaign basics of working hard to get voters out, Cawley pointed to two issues that have emerged since the May primary that he says affected the outcome of the mayoral election.

One concerned the recent adoption by the city council of an updated master plan for downtown Mount Airy, which many citizens – and businesses in the central business district – oppose, including by organizing a protest march on October 9.

Niland has been a strong supporter of the plan which critics fear will cause physical changes to streets and sidewalks that could damage the existing character of the downtown area.

Cawley voted against the plan on September 1, the same evening he was criticized by the majority of speakers in a public hearing, and said on Wednesday he thought it struck a chord with voters. “The rush to get this vote through for a reason that seems very hard to fathom.”

The other issue he says played a part involved a struggle from local body shop owner Frank Fleming, also known for his successful modified racing career. Fleming first hit a snag in his plan to use an existing panel at a site where he is developing a $2 million facility that will create jobs.

Fleming was banned from using the old sign due to exceeding city height regulations that apply to new businesses, despite its former use by a supermarket. Those rules were deemed petty and arbitrary by some observers and, as Cawley said on Wednesday, ran counter to common sense.

Cawley openly supported Fleming’s efforts to remedy the situation, which included appealing a zoning board’s decision to Surry County Superior Court.

City officials later approved an amendment allowing the local businessman to reuse the sign, with a host of his supporters in the audience, including a member of the NC General Assembly. Still, the damage seemed to have been done from a public perception standpoint.

“I think we need to do a better job of listening and taking more responsibility for educating the public,” Cawley suggested Wednesday of such situations.

“And I feel like we focused on the issues that were in front of us and people responded to our message,” the election winner said of his campaign team.

The mayor-elect cited public safety as the number one need he wants to address, particularly regarding staff departures from the city’s police and fire departments.

He had one last thought on Wednesday:

“Thank you to all these wonderful people who have supported me.”

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Tennis championships: 30 players fight for glory https://ottf.org/tennis-championships-30-players-fight-for-glory/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 05:44:55 +0000 https://ottf.org/tennis-championships-30-players-fight-for-glory/ Uplifting musical lyrics and a joyful atmosphere reigned inside the Moshood Abiola National Stadium, Abuja this weekend as the 2022 Sheroes Cup, a pre-season tournament, came to a close with great fanfare.The final game of the competition, which was attended by thousands of football enthusiasts including the Nigerian Football Federation (NFF) Technical Director, Austin Eguavoen, […]]]>

Uplifting musical lyrics and a joyful atmosphere reigned inside the Moshood Abiola National Stadium, Abuja this weekend as the 2022 Sheroes Cup, a pre-season tournament, came to a close with great fanfare.
The final game of the competition, which was attended by thousands of football enthusiasts including the Nigerian Football Federation (NFF) Technical Director, Austin Eguavoen, was a thrilling encounter with Edo Queens and Delta Queens, and decided by penalty kicks, Delta Queens taking the day 5-4.
Heading into the shootout, Edo Queens, who were top of the table, controlled most of the proceedings and looked more likely to triumph, but they couldn’t make their superiority in goal count. The match had to be settled by a penalty shootout, of which Delta proved to be the best taker.
Earlier, the Nasarawa Amazons defeated Confluence Queens 2-0 to clinch the bronze medal in the annual competition organized and sponsored by the Ratels Sports Development Foundation (RSDF).
Speaking about the competition, RSDF President Paul Edeh said the just-concluded tournament surpassed previous editions.
Edeh, owner of Naija Ratels, has urged wealthy football enthusiasts to join him in uplifting women’s football in Nigeria by donating to his course.
“I am particularly impressed by the quality of play of the different clubs throughout the competition. The players and officials have shown maturity and character, and that’s how it should be.
“We implored the best of approaches in the organization of the pre-season by ensuring that the best match officials, including the referees, officiated during the tournament and that they really gave a good image of themselves,” he said.

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Jerry Pierce, writer, humorist, vice president of the NSU, dies | Education https://ottf.org/jerry-pierce-writer-humorist-vice-president-of-the-nsu-dies-education/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 23:31:00 +0000 https://ottf.org/jerry-pierce-writer-humorist-vice-president-of-the-nsu-dies-education/ NATCHITOCHES — Jerry Pierce, who worked for more than 57 years on the staff of Northwestern State University and as vice president of external affairs since 1990, died Tuesday, Nov. 8 after a brief illness. Funeral arrangements are pending. Pierce’s impact at the university, in the community and around the state has been profound, not […]]]>

NATCHITOCHES — Jerry Pierce, who worked for more than 57 years on the staff of Northwestern State University and as vice president of external affairs since 1990, died Tuesday, Nov. 8 after a brief illness.

Funeral arrangements are pending.

Pierce’s impact at the university, in the community and around the state has been profound, not just as an administrator, but as a writer, comedian, ambassador, fundraiser and mentor to staff. at all levels of administration, including eight presidents of the NSU.

“Mr. Pierce has been a part of the fabric of this institution since the mid-1960s and has served under several presidents with integrity and class. He will be irreplaceable,” said NSU President Dr. Marcus Jones. as a friend and mentor who was always there to give sage advice.”

“Words cannot express the magnitude of the impact Jerry Pierce has had on Northwestern State University and on me professionally and personally,” said NSU Past President Dr. Chris Maggio. “He knew everyone statewide and opened so many doors for There wasn’t a day in my presidency that Jerry and I didn’t talk. Whether it was in preparation for visits on Capitol Hill, meetings with donors or presentations to constituents, Jerry was there for me with research done, briefings prepared and communications advice provided, he was such an effective communicator.

“Jerry Pierce is the greatest storyteller I’ve ever known,” said Dr. Jim Henderson, president of the University of Louisiana system and former president of the NSU. “All of us in the North West State family should be grateful that he dedicated this unparalleled talent to the service of our alma mater for nearly 60 years. His loss leaves a void that will never be filled, but his legacy will never be forgotten.

A graduate of Springhill High School, Pierce was recruited to Northwestern in 1957 as a football coach and served in that role for four years. As a student, he was an officer in the N Club and a sports editor for the college newspaper. He joined the Times-Picayune staff in New Orleans after graduating from journalism in 1961 and became an executive sportswriter at age 24.






In a photo from February 2022, Jerry Pierce, right, is pictured with the three living presidents of NSU, former president Dr. Chris Maggio, current president Dr. Marcus Jones and former president Dr. Jim Henderson.


Pierce returned to Northwestern in 1965 as director of sports information. He later served as director of the press office and assistant to the president before being named vice president of external affairs, overseeing NSU Athletics, NSU Foundation and Alumni Affairs, News Bureau/Media Relations, Sports Information, the Wellness Recreation and Activities Center and the USN. Recreational complex. He worked for years with legislators and other elected officials as the university’s government affairs representative, served as an institutional representative at the NCAA and the Southland Conference, and was a past conference president. He co-chaired Northwestern’s Centennial Celebration and 125th Anniversary activities. Pierce has represented NSU as a speaker and emcee at hundreds of events across the state for decades and as a host or guest on numerous radio and television shows and specials.

Pierce brought the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame to Natchitoches in 1972 and led the program for nearly 20 years. During this time, he was named one of the 20 “Most Influential People in Sports in Louisiana” by The Times-Picayune. He was instrumental in establishing the Long Purple Line, the NSU Alumni Hall of Distinction and the NSU Athletic N Club Hall of Fame and was recently inducted into both entities. Pierce has received numerous journalism awards and honors for other civic, social and professional activities.

In addition to writing and editing decades of press releases and publications at NSU, he has also written thousands of stories and articles of all kinds for Louisiana newspapers and publications nationwide. of State. Pierce has received numerous awards from the Louisiana Press Association for General Interest Columns, News Features, Sports Columns, Editorials and has been recognized by the Louisiana Sports Writers Association and the College Sports Information Directors of America for Reporting and sports publications.

Among his many other projects, Pierce was the author of a book of columns published by the Association of Louisiana Electric Cooperatives and wrote the text for the 200-page coffee table book “Northwestern at 125” commemorating NSU’s 125th anniversary. . He was Northwestern’s liaison for the filming of “Steel Magnolias” and “The Man in the Moon” and was co-editor of “Steel Magnolias Scrapbook” on the film set in Natchitoches.

Other professional recognitions include 50-year membership awards from the Louisiana Press Association and the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education and membership in the Blue Key National Honor Society. He was named a life member of the Louisiana Sports Writers Association and was the organization’s first recipient of the Mac Russo Award for his contributions to the ideals and progress of the organization.

Pierce has been extensively involved in civic activities in Natchitoches over the years. Among his honors and honors, he received the Mayor of Natchitoches Award for Community Service, the American Legion’s Natchitoches Parish Man of the Year, the President’s Award for the Parish of Natchitoches; City of Natchitoches Achievement Appreciation Award, Louisiana Ambassador Award from the Lieutenant Governor, member of the Chamber of Commerce’s inaugural Ambassadors Club, finalist for the Chamber of Commerce’s Natchitoches Parish Man of the Year; Kiwanis club member and leader; founding member of the Mystic Krewe of St. Denis; member of social organization The Agitators; Natchitoches Christmas Festival Dignitaries and Publicity Committee and a member of the First Baptist Church. He has coached and advised on youth sports programs and on budget, publicity and publications committees. He was also an avid tennis player and was a member of USTA teams that won over a dozen state championships, five regional titles, and one national championship.

Pierce provided substantial financial support to the university and was recognized for more than 20 consecutive years of contributions to the NSU Foundation. He and his wife Regina established endowed scholarships at the university in athletics and academics.

In addition to Regina, Pierce is survived by two sons, two stepchildren, seven grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

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Pickleball saga at Robb Field continues at Mission Bay Park Committee https://ottf.org/pickleball-saga-at-robb-field-continues-at-mission-bay-park-committee/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 17:25:41 +0000 https://ottf.org/pickleball-saga-at-robb-field-continues-at-mission-bay-park-committee/ By Geoff Page The saga of Pickleball’s attempt to find a home in Robb Field continued on Tuesday, Nov. 1, with an appearance before the Mission Bay Park Committee at the Santa Clara Recreation Center in Mission Beach. Stephan Boyland and Mike Shinzaki pitched on behalf of the San Diego Pickleball Association. The field involved […]]]>

By Geoff Page

The saga of Pickleball’s attempt to find a home in Robb Field continued on Tuesday, Nov. 1, with an appearance before the Mission Bay Park Committee at the Santa Clara Recreation Center in Mission Beach.

Stephan Boyland and Mike Shinzaki pitched on behalf of the San Diego Pickleball Association. The field involved three possible options for having pickleball at Robb Field.

#1 – Share the 12 existing tennis courts. There are six courts in one fenced compound and six in another. Pickleball would like to have six of the 12 courts.

#2 – Take 6 of 12 courts while building new replacement tennis courts somewhere nearby.

#3 – Build new pickleball fields somewhere in Robb Field.

Pickleball players prefer option #1 because they could get the game played quickly. Converting tennis courts to pickleball courts mainly involves transplanting and new nets. Option #2 was a close second as it would also allow them to get people into play quickly.

Option 3 was the least favorable option as it would take several years to complete the design, obtain permits and build.

Boyland and Shinzaki have been promoting pickleball for some time. The OB planning board voted in favor of a motion to let pickleball have four of the 12 courts for a one-year trial period at its meeting on March 2 this year. The first motion to give them six courts failed with a tie vote of 6 to 6.

The OBPB vote would require pickleballers to build a fence within the existing enclosure to enclose two tennis courts, which seemed impractical. The council stressed that it had no jurisdiction over Robb Field as it is part of Mission Bay Park. It was just a recommendation.

Regardless of the practicality, Boyland brought it up to show there was some support for pickleball in OB. OBPB President Andrea Schlageter attended the meeting and said the board voted to recommend the four tribunals. Schlageter said their motion only passed by a 7-5 vote, indicating ambivalence about the idea.

There is a major development in the history of pickleball that people may not be aware of. When they came before the OBPB, they were a for-profit company. This caused them problems because the Point Loma Tennis Club, which has run the courts for years, is a non-profit organization.

For-profit vs. not-for-profit was not a good optic for pickleballers. They solved this problem by becoming a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, The Pickleball Association of San Diego, a public benefit corporation. The original filing date was September 13, 2022. This change will mute much of the previous opposition.

Even with the move to nonprofit status, Boyland and Shinzaki said they were still committed to a number of improvements they would fund, without public funds, such as a new clubhouse. The existing facility is a very old mobile modular building that could be upgraded or replaced.

The presentation included a lot of information that most people know by now, such as the explosive popularity of pickleball. There are few places to gamble in the county and only one place in the city. The demand is there now for pickleball courts.

Robb Field has a number of advantages for pickleball, including ample parking and seclusion. Pickleball is a very noisy sport and complaints about it across the country can be found when these courts are near homes. Robb Field Courts are not located near residences.

It seems the effort to move some of the existing courts away from tennis may have lit the proverbial fire under the tennis cluster. It was mentioned that the tennis group came before the park committee in October with a presentation.

In the minutes of the October 4 committee meeting, under “Points of Information,” read this:

Peninsula Tennis Club Concept Plan – Todd Sprague Peninsula Tennis Club, President of the San Diego District Tennis Association is proposing a concept to expand the footprint of the Peninsula Tennis Club’s (PTC) 12 tennis courts with funding private to allow normal spacing between courts, adding Padel Courts to the PTC and updating the current clubhouse.

Sprague also generously allowed there to be a stand-alone pickleball facility elsewhere at Robb Field built with private money. It wasn’t just no to pickleball, it was no. This seemed to be exemplified by the inclusion in the PTC plan of new facilities for a different “Patel” type sport.

Here is a description of “Padel” from Wikipedia:

Padel is a racket sport that is usually played in doubles on an enclosed court slightly smaller than a doubles tennis court. The scoring is the same as in normal tennis, and the balls used are similar but with a little less pressure. The main differences are that the court has walls and the balls can be played in the same way as in the game of squash and that strong, unstringed bats are used.

So instead of a few pickleball courts, the tennis club wants to build something for a sport this writer had to research.

The tennis club’s plans are outlined and described in an October 17, 2022 press release from Sprague.

Curiously, there was no public opposition to the pickleball proposals. Six people spoke and all were for pickleball. Given the controversy over the abandonment of tennis facilities for pickleball, some opposition is to be expected.

Comments from committee members varied. Gio Ingolia called it “land grabbing”. Others were concerned about the process of deciding who should be given the right to manage existing facilities. There was no enthusiasm to support the takeover of existing facilities at Robb Field.

Ultimately, the committee was sympathetic to the pickleballer cause, but believed that a process should be followed for the facilities, including opening them up to proposals from other interested parties. The committee did not consider it appropriate for them to support an entity over other possible aspirants.

The motion that eventually passed was non-binding, to say the least. The committee voted to support hosting pickleball “somewhere in Mission Bay Park” and for the city to decide who would be chosen to operate it and where it would be located. It wasn’t something that would help pickleball fans anytime soon.

For more information on the organization of pickleball, go here

Rhodes dusty park

During the park committee meeting, a budget item interested OB. The Mission Bay Park Improvement Fund Oversight Committee has sought approval to allocate $10,807,066.53 to fund a series of projects.

Dusty Rhodes Park was to receive 20% of the total allocation or $2,215,000. Three posts are budgeted. The first was $444,000 for restrooms, which have been euphemistically rebranded as “sanitary blocks” in recent years. The second item was $327,000 for improving parking lots. The third item was $1,444,000 for a playground.

For more information, contact Gio Ingolia at gingolia@hotmail.com.

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What is a payday loan and other types of predatory loans? https://ottf.org/what-is-a-payday-loan-and-other-types-of-predatory-loans/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 09:01:17 +0000 https://ottf.org/what-is-a-payday-loan-and-other-types-of-predatory-loans/ Financial watchdog groups have raised concerns about predatory lenders taking advantage of low-income Americans who need cash fast as soaring inflation squeezes consumers. So what is predatory lending? Predatory lending imposes unfair or abusive loan terms on borrowers, including triple-digit interest rates and tight repayment terms. In the meantime, a “fair” loan guarantees the the […]]]>

Financial watchdog groups have raised concerns about predatory lenders taking advantage of low-income Americans who need cash fast as soaring inflation squeezes consumers.

So what is predatory lending?

Predatory lending imposes unfair or abusive loan terms on borrowers, including triple-digit interest rates and tight repayment terms. In the meantime, a “fair” loan guarantees the the same lending opportunities for all consumers, including low-cost loans for those with good credit ratings, in accordance with federal guidelines.

A predatory lender may also persuade a borrower to accept abusive terms through deceptive, coercive, exploitative or unscrupulous actions, according to Orlando-based debt.org, an online site that provides expert financial advice. An example is lenders targeting borrowers with credit problems or who have recently lost their jobs.

Predatory lending practices may also include fraudulent, deceptive and unfair tactics lenders use to ‘trick’ consumers into loans they cannot afford, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for Eastern Pennsylvania, citing costs high mortgages as contributing to borrowers who cannot keep their homes in good condition.

A person rides a scooter past a check cashing and payday loan store on March 11, 2022, in downtown Los Angeles.
PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images

Responsible Credit Centera North Carolina-based nonprofit research organization working to end predatory lending, released a study in late September that examined the “persistent damage of high-cost installment loans”, a form of predatory lending that includes “rent-a-bank” loans. The group says it found that predatory lending had a greater impact on people of color and low-income people.

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Sunday newsletter with a week of news https://ottf.org/sunday-newsletter-with-a-week-of-news/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 15:19:30 +0000 https://ottf.org/sunday-newsletter-with-a-week-of-news/ Good Sunday morning, Evanston! There was an important, if not always easy, conversation yesterday about who reparations are, why people oppose them, and whether reparations are even a solution. The Second Baptist Church Town Hall on Saturday was guided by the Rev. Dr. Michael CR Nabors and overseen by leaders such as Judge Lionel Jean-Baptiste […]]]>

Good Sunday morning, Evanston!

There was an important, if not always easy, conversation yesterday about who reparations are, why people oppose them, and whether reparations are even a solution. The Second Baptist Church Town Hall on Saturday was guided by the Rev. Dr. Michael CR Nabors and overseen by leaders such as Judge Lionel Jean-Baptiste as well as members of the interfaith community, City Council and the Reparations Committee of the city. “A lifetime of work awaits us,” said Robin Rue Simmons, chairman of the Reparations Committee. “Reparations are a complex process and it requires each of us to participate.” Richard Cahan of the Round Table was there to photograph history (Above, Nabors and Simmons Street are flanked by Shorefront Legacy Center founder Dino Robinson and Buddhist teacher Assay Horibe, left, with Fifth Ward Council member Bobby Burns, right). Look for full Gina Castro coverage later today on our website.

Now here’s the news of the week, highlighting what you, our readers, thought were the best stories of the past week (yes, we’re keeping a close eye on which stories get the most views), along with a few other new stories and ones you might have missed.

Don’t miss the round tables Evanston’s Voting Guide for the 2022 General Election. Evanston voters will choose 64 candidates for 36 vacancies, 61 justices for retention and three referendums from three different levels of government. This guide will help you prepare – especially for the judicial vote. Do we have a source for you!

Credit: Heidi Randhava

These two women – Robin Rue Simmons (left), founder and executive director of FirstRepair, and Monique Parsons, president and CEO of McGaw YMCA – were honored at the Chessmen Club gala, powerful, positive and full Last weekend. It was also inspiring, and after the event Street Simmons wrote this essay to describe what it was like to be in a room full of black Evanston leaders.

The 2023 budget proposal is now officially under debate. During his presentation to the city council on Monday Mayor Daniel Biss pushed back, saying he wouldn’t accept it as it is now. But there are still many meetings before the board votes on the final proposal. Between neighborhood meetings and town halls, you have the opportunity to make your voice heard. Here is our original take on the proposal. And Clare Kelly, a member of the first ward council, emphasized at her ward meeting what she considers crucial: increased contributions to the police and fire service pension fund.

Margaret Fisher Soffin, 75, died peacefully surrounded by her daughters on October 17 in Switzerland. She had a passion for justice, and among her many positions, she worked at Cabrini Green Legal Aid where she engaged in applications for erasure of records, sealing and clemency.

Do you like the work that the Round Table does? We know we would like to continue to inform you and raise the voices in Evanston. But as an award-winning author and media critic Margaret Sullivan tells us, the survival of community journalism is not certain. Join us at 7 p.m. on Thursday, November 10 for a webinar with her on her latest book, Confidential: Lessons (and worries) from an ink-stained life. This event kicks off our Fall NewsMatch fundraising campaign

Credit: Duncan Agnew

At a special meeting last week, the Evanston/Skokie District 65 School Board unanimously nominated Mya Wilkins as District 65’s Newest Board Member to fill the seat previously held by Anya Tanyavutti.

Credit: Wendi Kromach

Last weekend was the official reopening of the city’s dog beach. Defenders initially feared no one with two or four legs would show up, but less than 20 minutes after opening, more than 40 dogs and their people had gathered to celebrate in the lakeside off-leash space.

Credit: Susy Schultz

Are you all ready for Halloween? Well if you’re not decorating this year, your neighbors are! So the Round Table asked readers to send in their favourites, which is really a good guide Evanston’s Haunting Halloween Houses. Take the whole family for a drive on a decorating tour this week.


City News

The city has requested to add dedicated pickleball courts. Pickleball versus tennis was brought up at the Parks and Recreation Commission meeting as 30 people showed up to lobby for permanent pickleball courts. And pickleball fairness was also an issue.

The Equity and Empowerment Commission strongly supports gender equity in all city ordinances, which could mean a lot of changes to Evanston’s language if the city council agrees. And it’s also recommended several strategies to keep housing affordable, affordable.

The library board is asking for a tax increase of 3.9%. This would be his first increase after three years of stable budgets.

First plans unveiled for an affordable housing site on South Boulevard. The 60-unit, five-story apartment building would be for low- and middle-income households on South Boulevard between Chicago and Hinman Avenues.

Let’s mind our own business. Isabelle Reiniger takes a quick look at nine new businesses in Evanston that are open or opening, including six on the Main-Dempster Mile.

Small homeowners could get cash for COVID-related losses. Evanston landlords who own up to 35 homes and have seen a loss of rental income during the pandemic could soon get financial help.

Betty Meckstroth: 1940-2022. A dear soul as well as an expert on gifted children, co-author of a seminal book on the subject, has died. “Her cup was full and had endless kindness and love to share. She was unlike any other.


Public safety and health

October 20 COVID-19 Update: Evanston and Cook County remain at ‘low’ risk. In Evanston, the seven-day average for new cases was 12.9 on October 19, up from 10.9 the previous week, an increase of 18%.


Schools

Last school year, District 65’s per-student spending ranged from $17,681 to $23,838 per school. The average expenditure per student has increased by 39.6% over the past three years.

School Bus Assistants can be increased in District 65. A committee is recommending that the board increase the hourly rate for bus helpers from $13.65 to $15.50, which is more in line with the salary offered by most neighboring school districts.


Art & Life

Credit: Photo provided

Evanston arts council chooses new leaders; The coordinator resigns from his part-time position. The new board chair is Melissa Raman Molitor (above), adjunct associate professor at the School of the Art Institute.

Theater review: “Refuge” is a lyrical and moving story about crossing the border. Theo Ubique’s production is “a moving performance unlikely to be forgotten and surely not to be missed,” writes theater critic Cissy Lacks.

They do it: swarm of mosquitoes, a little whiskey and a sealed deal. Sally McBratney and Francis Jeffrey-Idun met in 2013 as colleagues at Cafe Ba-Ba-Reeba in Chicago. The latest love affair is part of the Round Table column, “They do”.

The Art of Making Art: Melanie Deal. Deal is a longtime Evanston collage and mixed media artist. She mainly works with paper and her collages have a very controlled structure and a very creative and playful image.

For Coming Out Day, “Gays and Gospel” celebrates the LGBTQ+ influence on church music. National Coming Out Day on October 11 was marked at Northwestern University with a tribute to the contribution of the LGTBQ+ community to gospel music and the black church.

Hundreds of people rally for abortion rights at a protest in Evanston. More than 200 people turned out last Sunday, many of whom wore pink and carried signs declaring, “Abortion is a right to health,” to protest the U.S. Supreme Court’s June reversal of the constitutional right to abortion.


Public place

Letter to the editor: Ryan Field gigs are a drain on NU’s money. “Rather than correcting the disparity between its economic resources and its historically inadequate financial contributions to Evanston, Northwestern wants to change the conversation,” writes 7th Ward resident David DeCarlo. “But Northwestern has shown that its representations should not be taken at face value.”

Letter to the Editor: Election 2022 – vote yes in first preservation referendum. The Evanston League of Women Voters Executive Committee is urging people to vote yes on the Cook County Forest Preserve issue.

Letter to the editor: Election 2022, tick yes for ranked voting. Your Vote Will Matter More is one of the five points highlighted to encourage people to support preferential choice voting.


Sports

The ETHS boys’ and girls’ cross-country teams qualify for next week’s sections. The boys team easily advanced a full squad to next week’s Hoffman Estates section. The Wildkit girls also qualified, who placed fourth in the team standings.

Photos of Saul Lieberman: After the end of the last game. “Am I disappointed with our record? Absolutely!” said ETHS head coach Mike Burzawa. “But I’m not disappointed with the tenacity and character these players have shown me.”

ETHS football coach: “It was a tough season…but there was no giving up in them.” Evanston finished 3-6 and will miss the Class 8A playoffs for the first time since 2019.

ETHS Field Hockey: Wildkit Rally fails in season-ending loss. Evanston ended the season under coach Annie Lesch with a six-game losing slip, but it was more the product of a scheduling oddity that found the Wildkits facing the toughest teams on their schedule. regular season.


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Should the UN start a football program? Student reviews are mixed | Education https://ottf.org/should-the-un-start-a-football-program-student-reviews-are-mixed-education/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 09:02:00 +0000 https://ottf.org/should-the-un-start-a-football-program-student-reviews-are-mixed-education/ After struggling for nearly two decades with declining enrollment, the University of New Orleans student body is less than half of what it was at its peak in 2004, when about 17,000 students attended. the lakeside campus. UN President John Nicklow, who was hired in 2016 in part to rekindle interest in the school, has […]]]>

After struggling for nearly two decades with declining enrollment, the University of New Orleans student body is less than half of what it was at its peak in 2004, when about 17,000 students attended. the lakeside campus.

UN President John Nicklow, who was hired in 2016 in part to rekindle interest in the school, has tried various tactics to attract more students. In its early years it was largely successful, until the pandemic slowed progress.

Now, with enrollment dropping again, Nicklow and other university officials believe a football team – a sport the UN has never played at university level in its more than six decades of existence – could reverse the trend.

Whether the UNO adds soccer, along with women’s soccer, women’s golf, and a marching band, depends on what the students decide. UNO students will vote Nov. 7-8 on whether to award themselves an additional $300 to $400 per semester in tuition to cover the costs of new sports.

The UNO currently field men’s baseball, basketball, tennis, golf, cross country, and track and field teams. Women’s sports include basketball, volleyball, beach volleyball, tennis, cross country, and track and field.

Nicklow, a former Bucknell University football player, said students and alumni often ask him about the possibility of a private football team.

“If the students want this, the students agree to pay, we will have it,” he said. “I have my own personal opinions and affection for football, but I take that out of the equation… it’s about the student voice.”

If approved, the additional fees would bring in about $3.6 million a year, according to the university. The balance of the $6 million cost to add sports would come from ticket sales, concessions, sponsorships and donations to the sports department, said UN spokesman Adam Norris.






Mixed student reviews

On a recent afternoon on campus, students walked past the Earl K. Long Library. On the ground nearby, a flyer fluttered in the wind. It said, “KEEP UNO AFFORDABLE! UNO DOESN’T NEED A FOOTBALL TEAM!!!” under a photo of a burning $100 bill.

At the University Center, undergraduates gathered next to a sign advertising a Dungeons and Dragons campus group. Gabriele Sudmann, 18, said she was drawn to the UN partly because she doesn’t have a football team and is wary of the changes football would bring.

“There is no football team – I liked that,” Sudmann said.

Sophomore Taylor Villareal was more blunt: “I don’t think enough people are going to care.”

Other students said they thought football would attract more students and create a stronger college community. Elias Ramirez, 19, who left Mexico for the UN’s naval architecture and marine engineering program, said football would bring a much-needed buzz to the campus, which is usually quiet and empty on weekends -end.

“Give me football on Saturday and I’ll be out on Saturday,” he said.

Sitting at a table outside the library with her sorority sisters, second Jenna Hymel, 19, said she thought football could be a glue for the campus community.

“We get women’s sports, we get a marching band, and we get a lot of school recognition,” she said. “It will definitely help retain a lot of students, grow the student population, grow the community.”

But other students have raised concerns about additional fees. Aibel Evans, 20, who transferred from Loyola University because of lower tuition at the UN, plans to vote “No” primarily because of the cost.

“Even still, going here, sometimes it’s hard to make ends meet,” Evans said.







uno 25 podium.jpg

UN President John Nicklow.




According to Nicklow, approximately 80% of UN students receive some form of financial aid or scholarship. The increased fees would be covered by financial assistance for those who qualify, he said.

Impact on schooling

Enrollment at the UN peaked at over 17,000 students in 2003. Hurricane Katrina in 2005 was a huge setback, and by the fall of that year only 6,700 students were enrolled. But the following year, that number nearly doubled, and the university, like others in the city, experienced slow enrollment growth until 2011, when the state made admissions requirements stricter and that fewer students could be accepted, Nicklow said.

After Nicklow took over, there were three years of steady growth from 2018 to 2020 when registrations hit nearly 8,400, but then came the pandemic and Hurricane Ida, both of which “cut the wind from our sails,” he said. This year, enrollment is 7,112 students, down 11% from 7,953 in 2021.

A feasibility study commissioned by the UNO Foundation calculates that each student added directly to the football program – football players, band members – would indirectly bring two more. According to the study, six schools that serve urban populations similar to the UN, including the state of Georgia, saw a 37.8% increase in enrollment over 10 years after the addition of football.

Nicklow said he thinks football will help attract more students straight from high school, a group less prevalent at the UN than at many schools.

“Adding football, I think, would probably bring more traditional-aged students into college,” Nicklow said. “We are not losing this diversity. We will always have the graduate student, we will always have the 45-year-old single mother who wants to further her education, we will always have the student who commutes and lives at home. But I think it complements and expands our population in a really positive way.

Not the first attempt to raise fees

UNO students have already faced the choice of charging themselves extra fees for athletics. In 2009, amid post-Katrina financial difficulties that included a $1 million decrease in the state’s UN operating budget, students narrowly voted against increasing their fees to $196 per year. semester.

The rejection almost led the university to move its athletic program to Division III, which does not award athletic scholarships, to save money. The move never happened and the Athletics remained in Division I.

Currently, the UN provides $3.3 million from the general fund, or about 3.4% of the school’s overall budget, to the athletic department. Athletics generates approximately $1.2 million a year through ticket sales, concessions, licensing and the like, and an additional $875,000 in lecture donations, sponsorships and distributions, according to Norris, the university spokesperson. Current athletics fees generate $1.3 million.

Students currently pay between $31.94 and $100 in fees, depending on the number of class hours they take. Under the proposed fees, part-time students would pay $300 and full-time students would pay $400.

According to the bill proposed by the Student Government Association last April, 90% of the revenue from the fee increase would go to athletics, 6% to the band, 1% to student activities, 1% to retention programs, 1% to intramurals and club programs and 1% to student diversity programs.

The UN Faculty Senate has not taken an official position on the initiative, said Faculty Senate President Chris Broadhurst.

Although the vote has not yet taken place, Nicklow said he has received verbal commitments to play from schools across the country and talks are underway with investors for a campus stadium. potential. Nevertheless, he emphasized that the students will have the final say.

“It’s not being forced on them, it’s their decision,” he said.

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Consumer advocates hail government plan to overhaul payday loan industry https://ottf.org/consumer-advocates-hail-government-plan-to-overhaul-payday-loan-industry/ Thu, 13 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://ottf.org/consumer-advocates-hail-government-plan-to-overhaul-payday-loan-industry/ The federal government plans to pass new legislation to overhaul the payday loan industry, implementing recommendations from a 2016 review that the previous government failed to act on. Key points: Federal government to implement recommendations from 2016 report on payday loans These reforms include capping repayments and banning lenders from making unsolicited offers. An end-of-year […]]]>

The federal government plans to pass new legislation to overhaul the payday loan industry, implementing recommendations from a 2016 review that the previous government failed to act on.

The reforms will cap a borrower’s repayments at 10% of their income, prohibit lenders from making unsolicited offers and directing customers to unregulated credit providers, and introduce anti-avoidance measures to prevent operators questionable to restructure and reopen businesses.

Financial Services Minister Stephen Jones said reforms are a priority for the government.

“It’s about making sure that when small credit is offered, often called a payday loan, it’s done in a safe environment and that vulnerable consumers aren’t taken advantage of.

“This is a long-awaited reform. The previous government carried out a review in 2016, which recommended the reforms we introduced in parliament,” he said.

On Friday, the Senate Economics Committee will hear from financial advisers, consumer advocates and the complaints authority about the proposed changes and industry issues.

The “predatory” system must change

The plan to implement the recommendations has been welcomed by consumer advocates and financial advisers, who say the current system is “predatory”.

Lyndall Millburn has worked as a financial adviser in Canberra for eight years and says people who use payday lenders are often desperate.

“People don’t borrow these loans for frivolous reasons,” she said. “They don’t have high incomes and they kind of need something right away.

“Most of them [are] depend on Centrelink for their income, and it just comes down to Centrelink not having enough money.

“They’re the best budgeters if they can switch to Centrelink, they’re better than me. But, when unforeseen costs come up, there’s just no way they have the ability to save for one. of them.” said Ms Millburn.

Many of Ms Millburn’s clients are promised quick money and easy refunds, but the costs are not always clear up front.

“They make it look really, really easy in their ads,” she said.

“But what the ad doesn’t disclose are the costs, 20% set-up fee, 4% interest per month, which works out to 48% interest per annum.

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6943 Tonga Table Tennis Federation Vacancy CEO 10-24 October 2022 https://ottf.org/6943-tonga-table-tennis-federation-vacancy-ceo-10-24-october-2022/ Mon, 10 Oct 2022 06:16:59 +0000 https://ottf.org/6943-tonga-table-tennis-federation-vacancy-ceo-10-24-october-2022/ TONGA TABLE TENNIS FEDERATION VACANCY CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER,Based at TASANOCHavelu, Tongatapu Company: Tonga Table Tennis Federation Inc. Job Title: Chief Executive Officer Reports to: Board of Directors. Proposed start date: 16e from November 2022. Duration: until 31st December 2023 with possibility of extension. CONTEXT: Tonga Table Tennis Federation (TTTF) is a non-profit national governing body […]]]>

TONGA TABLE TENNIS FEDERATION

VACANCY

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER,
Based at TASANOCHavelu, Tongatapu

Company: Tonga Table Tennis Federation Inc.

Job Title: Chief Executive Officer Reports to: Board of Directors.

Proposed start date: 16e from November 2022.

Duration: until 31st December 2023 with possibility of extension.

CONTEXT:

Tonga Table Tennis Federation (TTTF) is a non-profit national governing body for the sport of table tennis in Tonga based in Havelu, Tongatapu. TTTF is an affiliate member of the Tonga Sports Association and the National Olympic Committee (TASANOC). TTTF promotes table tennis by creating opportunities for active athletes and coaches of all backgrounds to participate in the sport through clubs and tournaments across the country each year. TTTF is a member of both the continent (ITTF Oceania) and the International Table Tennis Federations (ITTF).

The Tonga Table Tennis Federation is committed to providing inclusive table tennis programs and activities to all members of the community regardless of race, ethnicity, religion, ability, their age or sexual orientation. TTTF is also responsible for providing pathways for players, coaches and officials to attend international competitions, including the Pacific Games and the Olympics.

POSITION SUMMARY:

Based in Havelu at TASANOCThe CEO (CEO) provides leadership to manage the direction of TTTF in keeping with its mission and values. Responsibilities include implementing the TTTF strategic plan as adopted by the

Board of Directors; ensure the operational efficiency, sustainability and promotion of TTTF programs and services; effectively establish relationships and communications with volunteers, partners and sponsors; manage public relations, media and marketing initiatives; take measures to ensure the fiscal soundness of the TTTF; perform righteous and responsible personal actions; and the success of resource development initiatives. Moderate travel will be required.

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

The following is a list of essential duties and responsibilities. Additional duties and responsibilities are identified in TTTFThe strategic plan and other responsibilities can be identified and assigned.

Executive leadership

  • Confer with the Board of Directors to establish overall strategic and tactical business objectives.
  • In conjunction with the Board of Directors, establish the current and long-term goals, objectives, plans and policies of the organization.
  • Ensure effective hiring, leadership and management of employees.
  • Coach, motivate and develop employees. Evaluate employee performance and hold employees accountable.
  • Ensure the effectiveness, operation and success of programs and services so that they are sustainable and consistent with TTTF‘s mission, as well as a high quality standard.
  • Manage the finances of TTTF in accordance with the approved budget and report to the Board in a timely manner.
  • Responsible for all profits and losses of the organization.
  • Create and instill a fun work culture that inspires pride, passion, dedication, loyalty and cohesion. Ensure appropriate employee training and development programs.
  • Identify areas of activity in which TTTF would benefit from outsourcing and developing external partnerships to improve organizational efficiency.
  • Resource development, marketing, communication and technology.
  • Diversify revenue through sponsorship solicitation, licensing and other business initiatives.
  • Prospect, negotiate and close potential new sponsors, create dynamic activation plans and generate benefits for TTTF constituents.
  • Look for opportunities to increase national awareness TTTF and the sport of table tennis.
  • Serve as public spokesperson for media requests and interviews.
  • Be present and engaged TTTF events.
  • Expand the reach of the organization and drive member and membership engagement.
  • Regularly communicate the milestones and successes achieved by the organization.
  • Foster new and ongoing relationships with TTTF club managers.
  • Continue to nurture and ensure ongoing positive relationships with the ITTF and ITTF-Oceania.
  • Establish a regionalization program across the country.
  • Engage and improve the quantity, scope and effectiveness of TTTF volunteers and committees to leverage these important human resources.

Maintain relationship with ITTF-Oceania as a major partner.

  • Responsible for obligations in all agreements with ITTF-Oceania.
  • Managing the Successful Implementation of Smash Down Barriers (bathroom) and the development and implementation of the Bounce it Back (BiB) schools program.
  • Completion of quarterly, half-yearly and annual reports for the bathroom Program.

EDUCATION AND/WHERE LIVE OBLIGATORY:

  • Bachelor’s degree or higher in business, nonprofit management, sports management, or equivalent work or educational experience.
  • Minimum of 5 years of senior level corporate experience. Association or National Sport Organization governance experience is a plus.

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS/CAPABILITIES:

  • Demonstrated ability to create, develop and oversee the implementation of strategic and operational business plans.
  • Demonstrated skills in financial management, including budgeting, planning and administration.
  • Strong written and verbal communication skills, including excellent public speaking skills.
  • Proven ability to negotiate all aspects of contracts, engagements, activation, etc.
  • Skills in organizational development, personnel management, budgeting and resource development.
  • Excellent leadership and people skills, with an ability to partner with a dynamic and engaged volunteer and member base.
  • Possess personal qualities of integrity, credibility and commitment to the mission of the organization.
  • Flexible and able to prioritize key activities and oversee multiple tasks and priorities. Ability to work effectively in a fast-paced environment.
  • Knowledge of digital and technology trends and best practices relevant to a member-focused sports organization.

REMUNERATION

Range 32,000.00 – 36,000.00 per year; starting salary will depend on qualifications and experience.

APPLICATION TREAT:

Interested candidates should send a cover letter and curriculum vitae to netinamoalalatu [at] Gmail [dot] com speak 24e from October 2022. Please contact Netina Latu for more information on 7754509 or above email.

Matangi Tonga Online, ref. #6943 Tonga Table Tennis Federation October 10-24, 2022
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Men with the most medals at the World Table Tennis Championships https://ottf.org/men-with-the-most-medals-at-the-world-table-tennis-championships/ Wed, 05 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://ottf.org/men-with-the-most-medals-at-the-world-table-tennis-championships/ These athletes have a reputation for delivering at the mega event. Table tennis is probably one of the most underrated sports in the world today. The game doesn’t really get the credit it deserves. More so because of its contemporary tennis which monopolizes all the limelight. Unlike tennis, it may not have the budget or […]]]>

These athletes have a reputation for delivering at the mega event.

Table tennis is probably one of the most underrated sports in the world today. The game doesn’t really get the credit it deserves. More so because of its contemporary tennis which monopolizes all the limelight. Unlike tennis, it may not have the budget or the glamor involved, but it takes a keen eye to understand the skills needed to master this difficult game.

The fact that you have to control a high-speed ping pong ball on a small table makes it even more difficult. Players must be quick, precise and agile to score every point. Their attack and defense must be coordinated so as not to fall into the opponent’s trap. Over the years, we’ve seen multiple champions dominate these blazingly fast games.

Today, we are going to look at the history of these champions. We are going to do a tally of the male players with the most medals at the World Table Tennis Championships.

5. Ma Long (16)

China’s Ma Long is widely regarded as one of the greatest table tennis players of all time. In fact, Long was instrumental in China’s success at the Olympics and on the world stage in general. The Liaoning-born player holds sixteen world championship medals. A medal tally that includes twelve gold, one silver and three bronze. Singles and doubles combined.

Ma won her first World Championships medal in 2006 (Bremen) and her most recent in 2019 (Budapest). In fact, in 2019 in Budapest, he won both the singles and doubles events. In singles, he defeated Mattias Falck of Sweden in a grueling five sets (11-5,11-7,7-11, 11-9,11-5). In doubles, Long and his partner, Wang Chuqin beat the Romanian and Spanish pair of Ovidiu Ionescu and Alvaro Robles.

Apart from the world championships, Long has also won several medals at the Olympics and Asian Games. The Asian Championships and World Cup also saw Long weave his magic with his patented DHS Hurricane 3 paddle.

4. Ichiro Ogimura (20)

Next on that elite list is former world number one Ichiro Ogimura. The former ITTF President started playing as a student at Metropolitan Tenth Junior High School. After winning the All-Japan National Championships, Ichiro represented Japan at the World Championships. He won a total of 20 medals. This includes twelve gold, five silver and three bronze medals.

The “ping-pong diplomat”, as he was respectably called because of his diplomatic politics in sport, also invented the “fifty-one percent doctrine”. According to this, a player could risk hitting a smash if they thought they had a 51% chance of beating their opponent with it. It’s a style he also passed on to ITTF World Champions like Zhuan Zedong and Stellan Bengtsson. Both were students of Ogimura.

3. Bohumil Vana (30)

Bohumil Vana was one of Czechoslovakia’s greatest tennis players. He was born on January 17, 1920 in Prague. Vana’s consistency in her games was one of her main strengths. The Czechoslovak never really had a “rest day”. His incredible 30 medals won in 20 years, from 1935 to 1955, clearly testify to this.

Bohumil was equally proficient in singles, doubles and team play. His medals included thirteen gold, ten silver and seven bronze. Besides that, he has also won five English Open titles. His last medal dates back to 1955 in Utrecht, the Netherlands.

2. Miklos Szabados (24)

Prior to modern Chinese dominance, it was Hungary that established themselves as a strong table tennis contingent. Behind this success lies the contribution of some solid Hungarian players. Miklos Szabados is one of those great athletes. The Budapest-born player started playing table tennis at the age of thirteen and hasn’t looked back since.

Szabados won a staggering total of twenty-four medals. His collection included fifteen gold, six silver and three bronze medals. Of which the year 1931 was the most remarkable. Miklos won four world events that year. This included singles, doubles, mixed doubles and the Swaythling Cup. Towards the end of his career in 1937, Szabados emigrated to Australia where he opened a table tennis club. He died in Sydney in 1962.

1. Viktor Barna (41)

Another Hungarian responsible for European dominance in table tennis. Viktor Barna’s legacy lives on even after 50 years of his death. Considered the best in the game. Barna dominated for over two decades in the sport. Victor has also represented two countries during his long and illustrious career.

From 1929 to 1938, he represented Hungary. Following this, he moved to the UK and acquired British citizenship in 1952. Ironically, Barna won his first medal in his home country (Hungary) and his last medal in his adopted country (UK). United). He literally won a medal in every nation he played in. Barna also published a book after his retirement in 1957.

He also chose a suitable name for it and named it “How to Win at Table Tennis”.

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